News

  1. Scientist Uncovers Secret Life of Soil

    Scientist Uncovers Secret Life of Soil Some connections in the vast web of life are little easier to see than others. In the Smokies this time of year, black bears lumber up the swaying branches of native cherry trees to feast on dark, sun-ripened fruit. Wood thrushes swoop down from their perches to snatch fat caterpillars and worms from the forest floor. A hungry snail might Read more...
  2. Building the Smokies, the Rise of the CCC

    Building the Smokies, the Rise of the CCC Today, Great Smoky Mountains National Park is the most visited national park in the United States, but it was once at risk of being destroyed before it even existed. With the industrial boom from World War I in the early 20th century, natural resources across the country were being consumed faster than they could be replenished. The extensive Read more...
  3. Camera in the Park: Summer Flowers in Cades Cove

    Camera in the Park: Summer Flowers in Cades Cove By Nye Simmons Photography is quite simple, and yet at times it can seem hopelessly complex. Some people go to university to study photography and get advanced degrees, but others manage to do it without any special training at all.  Not a photographer, you say? Chances are you already have a camera app on your phone that has amazing Read more...
  4. Safe Passage facilitator Jeff Hunter named Wildlife Conservationist of the Year

    Safe Passage facilitator Jeff Hunter named Wildlife Conservationist of the Year Work hard; play harder. This catchy philosophy of work-life balance can be aptly ascribed to Jeffrey Hunter of Burnsville, an avid long-distance hiker and fan of the Grateful Dead who was recently named Wildlife Conservationist of the Year in the North Carolina Wildlife Federation’s Governor’s Conservation Awards. Read more...
  5. Trailside Talk: Alum Cave Trail—Heart of the Smokies

    Trailside Talk: Alum Cave Trail—Heart of the Smokies On any given day, and particularly on weekends, the trailhead parking area for Alum Cave Trail is among the most crowded in the Smokies. Cars spill out of the parking area and line up on the sides of US 441, the main road bisecting the park from north to south. It seems that some people like the trail so much that they are willing to walk Read more...
  6. ‘Sepia Tones’ Welcomes Guest Dom Flemons, American Songster

    ‘Sepia Tones’ Welcomes Guest Dom Flemons, American Songster In the latest episode of the award-winning podcast miniseries Sepia Tones: Exploring Black Appalachian Music, released on Friday, July 29, hosts Dr. William Turner and Dr. Ted Olson are joined by lauded musician Dom Flemons for a compelling conversation on the many Appalachian influences and inspirations that have come to shape his music. When Read more...
  7. Remote cabin memorializes important Southern artist

    Remote cabin memorializes important Southern artist Pam Yarnell, an avid hiker and a member of Great Smoky Mountains Association, sent me an email in February of this year asking for my help. She wanted to make sure others were able to learn about a significant artist who had a special connection to Great Smoky Mountains National Park. “A few years ago, a handful of us were hiking in the Read more...
  8. Wildflowers 101: Woodland Pinkroot and Mountain Camelia

    Wildflowers 101: Woodland Pinkroot and Mountain Camelia Please remember that picking plants is prohibited in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Additionally, even some plants with traditional folk uses can have toxic properties if improperly prepared or used. Story and images by Tom Harrington In this edition of Wildflowers 101, let’s look at two beautiful wildflowers that are not Read more...
  9. Summer Hiking Tips: Part Two

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park offers hundreds of miles of backcountry trails perfect for summer walks in the woods. This is the second in a two-part series on ways to stay safe while hiking these paths during the summertime. There are common scenarios hikers might face during the summer months: storms, ticks, and heat, to name a few. Read more...
  10. Lessons in Misreading a Smokies Map

    Lessons in Misreading a Smokies Map Story and photo by Hunter Upchurch In my history classes, I try to teach my students that, as much as maps can reveal about a place, they can also obscure other important information. For example, a political map of Europe just prior to World War I can help us understand the rivalries between the German and Russian empires, whose borders at Read more...

Items 31-40 of 523

Show per page