Author Reading: The Great Smoky Mountain Salamander Ball

Author Reading: The Great Smoky Mountain Salamander Ball

Lisa-horstman

We are privileged to have author/illustrator Lisa Horstman read her famous award-winning book, The Great Smoky Mountain Salamander Ball. Winner of the National Park Service First Place award for Excellence in 1997, this book has been a Smokies classic for almost 25 years.

The idea for The Great Smoky Mountain Salamander Ball began with a small newspaper clipping in the Great Smoky Mountains Association files. In the article, a couple traveling through the Smokies on a dark, stormy night witnessed a mysterious crossing of hundreds of salamanders across a rain-soaked road. Horstman, and the book's editor, Steve Kemp, laughed over the idea that the little amphibians must've been headed to a big party. From there, the author's overactive imagination took over.

Stay tuned the rest of the week to learn more about salamanders and their presense in the Smokies.

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