Smoky Mountains Wildlife & Biodiversity

Featured Posts
  1. Science at Sugarlands: Post-fire Plant-Soil Interactions

    Science at Sugarlands: Post-fire Plant-Soil Interactions

  2. Species-a-Day Calendar puts park biodiversity at people’s fingertips

    Species-a-Day Calendar puts park biodiversity at people’s fingertips

  3. Lichens of the Smokies Revealed at Science at Sugarlands

    Lichens of the Smokies Revealed at Science at Sugarlands

  1. Species-a-Day Calendar puts park biodiversity at people’s fingertips

    Species-a-Day Calendar puts park biodiversity at people’s fingertips

    A new Species-a-Day perpetual flip calendar available now in Great Smoky Mountains National Park visitor centers allows park enthusiasts to learn more about a place renowned for its diversity of plant and animal life on each day of this and all years to come.

    Read more...
  2. Lichens of the Smokies Revealed at Science at Sugarlands

    Lichens of the Smokies Revealed at Science at Sugarlands

    James Lendemer loves lichens. He loves talking about them, showing pictures of them, and telling others what lichens are and how they are important.

    Read more...
  3. Science at Sugarlands: Post-fire Plant-Soil Interactions

    Science at Sugarlands: Post-fire Plant-Soil Interactions

    By Frances Figart, creative services director

    Soil is the foundation of our planet. We walk on top of it every day, yet most of us rarely think about it.

    Read more...
  4. DLIA Brings Beetle Mania to the Smokies: An interview with Claire Winfrey

    Beetle Study

    Did you know… about one in every four animals on the planet is a beetle! Of the  roughly 400,000 species of beetles known, some are pollinators, others recyclers –some even help to offset the effects of climate change.

    “Insects are an instant connection to the wild and an extreme example of Earth’s biodiversity,” says Claire Winfrey, a beetle expert and second-year Ph.D. student in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. “Especially in warmer months, take some time to look in almost any type of habitat and you can find them.”

    Read more...
  5. Science at Sugarlands: Grassy Balds

    Grassy Balds

    Mysterious and haunting, Southern Appalachian grassy balds have long fascinated scientists and hikers alike. How many balds are there in the Smokies? How did they evolve? How do they support rare plants? Can balds be found in other parts of the world?

    Read more...
  6. Curiosity Cabinet: Hickory Horned Devils become Regal Moths

    Citheronia regalis

    By Peyton Proffitt

    This month, curiosity drew me to the remarkable collection of insects housed at the Twin Creeks Science and Education Center. At first, I was overwhelmed by the number, age and diversity of the specimens, but after a few minutes, I decided to focus on specimens that made me think, “Oh, how pretty!”

    Read more...
  7. Little Sluice of Heaven: Creek Crossings and Crippling Critters

    Little Sluice of Heaven: Creek Crossings and Crippling Critters

    By Lisa Duff

    When Great Smoky Mountains Association volunteer hike guide Lloyd Shiver suggested we knock out two trails with significant creek crossings this summer, I thought, “Can’t ask for a better time to cool off in the Smokies than late June and July.” Add to that the fact boat rides would be required to cross Fontana Lake at the conclusion of each, I jumped at the chance to join in.

    Read more...
  8. Studies Offer Insights into Behaviors of Park Bears

    Bear searching trash for food

    By Steve Kemp

    Four research projects focused on bears in the Great Smoky Mountains are currently underway or have recently been completed. Of the four, the results of two are troubling, one is encouraging, and on the last, it’s too early to tell.

    Read more...
  9. DLiA’s Science at Sugarlands Focuses on Fish Restoration

    Pat Rakes

    By Frances Figart

    Part of the mission of any national park is protecting and restoring species that were once native. Restoring native fish is an exciting area of Smokies science that goes unseen by those who are not swimming or snorkelling in park waters.

    Read more...
  10. Science at Sugarlands Features Wildflowers

    Science at Sugarlands Features Wildflowers

    By Frances Figart

    You couldn’t pick a more perfect month than May to head out on the trails to spot wildflowers. to help you learn more about them, Discover Life in America will host Wildflowers: Gems of the Smokies at the Sugarlands Visitor Center Friday, May 17, from 1–3 p.m.

    Read more...

Items 1-10 of 26

Page
Show per page