Tag: African American experiences

  1. Sepia Tones Welcomes Amythyst Kiah and Jack Tottle

    Sepia Tones Welcomes Amythyst Kiah and Jack Tottle In a new episode of Sepia Tones: Exploring Black Appalachian Music, hosts Dr. William Turner and Dr. Ted Olson talk to Amythyst Kiah—an acclaimed, Grammy-nominated musician whose work blending the genres of folk, rock, and roots music has established her as a distinctive new voice in Appalachia. Reconnecting with Kiah in this episode is Read more...
  2. Appalachian Studies Association honors ‘Sepia Tones’ series with e-Appalachia Award

    Appalachian Studies Association honors ‘Sepia Tones’ series with e-Appalachia Award On Thursday, March 17, Great Smoky Mountains Association’s ongoing podcast miniseries, Sepia Tones: Exploring Black Appalachian Music, was recognized with the e-Appalachia Award at the 45th Annual Appalachian Studies Association Conference.  The e-Appalachia Award is given annually in recognition of an outstanding media source that Read more...
  3. The African American Experiences Project is Making the Invisible Visible

    The African American Experiences Project is Making the Invisible Visible By Atalaya Dorfield A year and a half ago, if you would have told me that today I would be working with the National Park Service, my response would have been, “What is the National Park Service?” I never would have imagined that I would be writing this column for Black History Month or that, in June of 2021, I would be hiking up Read more...
  4. ‘Sepia Tones’ Returns with Music—and Dance—on the Move

    ‘Sepia Tones’ Returns with Music—and Dance—on the Move The second episode of the Sepia Tones: Exploring Black Appalachian Music podcast mini-series begins with a story. “He said, ‘Now, I’m gonna tell you, if I ever catch you playing the fiddle on my route ever again, I will make sure that you get put under the jail,’” recalls fiddler and prominent old-time musician Read more...
  5. Sepia Tones, A New Podcast Series Exploring Black Appalachian Music

    Sepia Tones, A New Podcast Series Exploring Black Appalachian Music by Ted Olson The lockdown summer of 2020 was a difficult time in the United States. The coronavirus pandemic surged, contentious election campaigns exacerbated growing political divisions, and protests of police killings brought about a national reckoning over entrenched racial and socioeconomic inequalities. While the first two issues Read more...
  6. New Sepia Tones Series Adds Missing Liner Notes to Smokies Music History

    New Sepia Tones Series Adds Missing Liner Notes to Smokies Music History The Great Smoky Mountains are positively full of music. The songs begin with the music of the Cherokee—the Principal People who passed down their myths, songs, and dance long before the invention of a written Cherokee language. Later, in the 19th and 20th centuries, the music came to include the songs of settlers, the enslaved peoples who Read more...

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