Tag: DLiA

  1. Word from the Smokies: Meet the Wild Creatures Native to Appalachia’s ‘Sky Islands’

    Word from the Smokies: Meet the Wild Creatures Native to Appalachia’s ‘Sky Islands’ by Aaron Searcy, Publications Associate A new study is taking a closer look at the startling forms of life that exist only on some of Appalachia’s highest mountaintops—some of which are in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. On these ancient peaks, dubbed ‘sky islands,’ are the last living remnants of the region’ Read more...
  2. Word from the Smokies: Retired Biology Professor Dan Pittillo Still Digs Research

    Word from the Smokies:  Retired Biology Professor Dan Pittillo Still Digs Research By Frances Figart, Creative Services Director I met and became friends with Dr. Dan Pittillo through this column. He writes me an email every time one of my articles is published here; in fact, that’s how I know what day they run. He always tells me something I didn’t know about my topic, and he shows the kind of appreciation upon Read more...
  3. Smokies Science Series Returns with a Spotlight on Butterflies

    Smokies Science Series Returns with a Spotlight on Butterflies by Aaron Searcy, Publications Associate Warren Bielenberg spends a lot of time photographing Southern Appalachian butterflies in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. But he willingly admits that his journey of butterfly discovery didn’t begin in earnest until he retired from 34 years as a park ranger and began volunteering in Cades Cove Read more...
  4. The cicada-pocalypse is nigh!

    The cicada-pocalypse is nigh! By Will Kuhn Be on the lookout for a rare natural history event that’s unfolding right now! This month through mid-July, billions of 17-year periodical cicadas are expected to emerge across a wide swath of the eastern US, including in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. And it might get a little loud. Periodical cicadas comprise a Read more...
  5. Share Your Photos for Science! DLiA to Host Talk on Community Science SnapIt & MapIt Project

    Share Your Photos for Science! DLiA to Host Talk on Community Science SnapIt & MapIt Project Photo by Valerie Polk Did you know you could be using your phone to help study the exceptional biodiversity in Great Smoky Mountains National Park? Join Discover Life in America (DLiA) Science and Research Director Will Kuhn on Friday, October 16, from 1 to 3 p.m. for a crash course on Species SnapIt & MapIt—a unique community Read more...
  6. Come one, come all to the Salamander Ball

    Come one, come all to the Salamander Ball By Steve Kemp Longtime park partner Discover Life in America (DLIA) has announced its first-ever Salamander Ball on Wheels! This fun, family-friendly event will take place at the Parkway Drive-in Theater in Maryville, TN, on Thursday, October 15, 2020. Activities will include live music by guitarist Bill Mize, videos highlighting DLIA’s Read more...
  7. Little Beetle Makes a Big Difference

    Little Beetle Makes a Big Difference By Frances Figart, Creative Services Director Maggie Mamantov loves... dung beetles! She’s getting her PhD in ecology and evolutionary biology and studying the impact of climate change on non-native species, particularly dung beetles in the genus Onthophagus. After getting her B.A from Iowa’s Grinnell College, Mamantov has come back Read more...
  8. Long-Lost Number 31: The Green Salamander

    Long-Lost Number 31: The Green Salamander By Will Kuhn, Director of Science and Research, Discover Life in America Great Smoky Mountains National Park is known for its inordinately high diversity of salamanders. Indeed, there are 30 documented species, ranging from the tiny pygmy salamander (Desmognathus wrighti) to the huge hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis). Among the many Read more...
  9. Blue Ghosts: Spirits of the Forest Part 2

    Blue Ghosts: Spirits of the Forest Part 2 By Gus Elmore, former intern at Discover Life in America, and Will Kuhn, DLiA’s Director of Science and Research In Part 1 of this two-part series, we learned about the blue ghost firefly (Phausis reticulata), so named for the ghostly light produced by males in their slow, silent search for females in the forests of Appalachia. We also Read more...
  10. Blue Ghosts: Spirits of the Forest Part 1

    Blue Ghosts: Spirits of the Forest Part 1 By Gus Elmore, former intern at Discover Life in America, and Will Kuhn, DLiA’s Director of Science and Research The synchronous firefly may hog the limelight, but another kind of firefly is perhaps underappreciated given its suite of fascinating characteristics: the blue ghost firefly (Phausis reticulata). This species is so named for the Read more...

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