Tag: George Ellison

  1. Permanent Camp: The Principle of Verticality

    Permanent Camp: The Principle of Verticality Image of George and Elizabeth Ellison by Quintin Ellison By George Ellison There are a few basic concepts that have helped me through the years to sort out the almost bewildering diversity of the geologic aspects, plants, animals, and natural areas that make up these very old mountains we call home. The “Principle of Read more...
  2. Permanent Camp: Spring Ephemerals

    Permanent Camp: Spring Ephemerals Image of George and Elizabeth Ellison by Quintin Ellison By George Ellison Among the early woodland wildflowers is a distinctive group categorized as spring ephemerals. It is one of our most interesting plant groups, one that numbers some of the most showy, renowned, and interesting Blue Ridge wildflowers: trout lily, squirrel Read more...
  3. New Horace Kephart Collection Showcases Previously Unpublished Writings

    New Horace Kephart Collection Showcases Previously Unpublished Writings A new book released by University of Tennessee Press presents the most extensive collection of writings in print to date by early Great Smoky Mountains National Park advocate and author Horace Kephart. Edited by Mae Miller Claxton and George Frizzell of Western Carolina University, Horace Kephart: Writings provides a perfect companion to Great Read more...
  4. Permanent Camp: Asters

    Permanent Camp: Asters by George Ellison with illustration by Elizabeth Ellison The seasons spin around: spring into summer into autumn into winter. As I write this, summer is sliding into autumn. For some, it's a time of decline and decay, of frenzied wood gathering and other preparations for the often-dark days of winter. For others, autumn is the most Read more...
  5. Permanent Camp: Grass-of-Parnassus

    Permanent Camp: Grass-of-Parnassus by George Ellison with illustration by Elizabeth Ellison  “From a distance the white flowers are attractive but not extraordinary; when observed closely, though, the delicate tracery of the green veins on the waxy white petals is astonishing.” ~Alan S. Weakley, “Flora of the Southern and Mid-Atlantic States& Read more...
  6. Permanent Camp: Skunk Goldenrod

    Permanent Camp: Skunk Goldenrod By George Ellison with illustration by Elizabeth Ellison  Have you ever been enjoying a walk along a mountain trail when you suddenly encountered a musky unpleasant smell? I've learned to consider five likely sources: bear scat, wild boar, carrion vine, galax, or goldenrod. Goldenrod? Yes, if you’re walking in the higher elevations Read more...
  7. Ellison and McCue: Kephart Brought Them Together

    Ellison and McCue: Kephart Brought Them Together By Frances Figart, Creative Director  In 2019, George Ellison and Janet McCue won the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award for their Back of Beyond: A Horace Kephart Biography (2019, Great Smoky Mountains Association). They will be interviewed on a Lit Café Zoom meeting hosted by the Western North Carolina Historical Association on Read more...
  8. Permanent Camp - Southern Harebell

    Permanent Camp - Southern Harebell By George Ellison with illustration by Elizabeth Ellison Plants and animals are often at war with one another. But they also find avenues that allow them to practice cooperative behavior. No relationship in the natural world demonstrates this more clearly than the one forged millions of years ago between flowering plants and their pollinators Read more...
  9. Permanent Camp: Fraser Magnolias

    Permanent Camp: Fraser Magnolias In the coves of the southern Appalachians, cooled by the breezes set astir by ever-falling water … this lovely tree [Fraser magnolia] is most at home, its flowers shining forth serenely as water-lilies floating in the forest green.  ~ D. C. Peattie, A Natural History of Trees of Eastern and Central America (1950) Written by Read more...
  10. Permanent Camp: Rugel's Ragwort

    Permanent Camp: Rugel's Ragwort Story by George Ellison with image by Elizabeth Ellison This is the story of Rugel's ragwort (Rugelia nudicaulis)—one of the most rare and interesting plants in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park—and its eccentric namesake, the German-born plant collector Ferdinand Ignatius Xavier Rugel. In 1840, Rugel (1806-1879) came to the Read more...

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