Tag: Photography

  1. Camera in the Park: Goldenrod Season in Cades Cove

    Camera in the Park: Goldenrod Season in Cades Cove From about mid-August to the first Smokies frost, bright yellow clusters of goldenrods add intense patches of color to a mostly green landscape.  A quick Wikipedia search turns up interesting facts about the flower, including that it is the state flower of Kentucky, Nebraska, and South Carolina—and previously Alabama before being Read more...
  2. Camera in the Park: Summer Flowers in Cades Cove

    Camera in the Park: Summer Flowers in Cades Cove By Nye Simmons Photography is quite simple, and yet at times it can seem hopelessly complex. Some people go to university to study photography and get advanced degrees, but others manage to do it without any special training at all.  Not a photographer, you say? Chances are you already have a camera app on your phone that has amazing Read more...
  3. Image for the Asking: How Old Is Old?

    Image for the Asking: How Old Is Old? Story and image by Don McGowan “How high is up?” This is a question that children have harangued adults about unceasingly over the years. It’s one that can seem sublimely foolish—at least as most of those adults would see it. There is, too, a second inquiry which often accompanies the first: “How old is old?& Read more...
  4. Image for the Asking: A Little River That’s Not Really So Little

    Image for the Asking: A Little River That’s Not Really So Little Story and image by Don McGowan There is a place in the Smokies known as Collins Gap. It is where the western slope of Mount Collins tumbles down to meet the eastern slope of Kuwahi (Clingmans Dome). In other words, it’s a high place along the crest of the Smokies ridge, somewhere around 5,723 feet. Below the north face of Collins Gap, Read more...
  5. Echoes in the Mountains: A herd in sacred waters

    Echoes in the Mountains: A herd in sacred waters Images by Phoebe Carnes Before I began observing elk in Smokies, I never thought of them as water-loving creatures. But it wasn’t long before I learned that the elk here have a profound relationship with the Oconaluftee River that is as fascinating as it is multifaceted. Bull B takes a drink on a misty September morning in Read more...
  6. Image for the Asking: The Many Connections of a Small, Nameless Stream

    Image for the Asking: The Many Connections of a Small, Nameless Stream Story and image by Don McGowan Although you may not be familiar with it, the wet weather creek in this image is associated with the founding history of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. As far as I know, the stream at this point in its journey has no name, though it will eventually merge its waters into Walker Camp Prong—half of West Read more...
  7. Image for the Asking: A Winter Wonderland—Whither the Darling Buds of May?

    Image for the Asking: A Winter Wonderland—Whither the Darling Buds of May? Story and image by Don McGowan When I left my home state of Georgia more than a quarter century ago to live in the shadow of Great Smoky Mountains National Park (Boyd’s Creek, Tennessee, in 1993 to be exact), photographing snow in the park was a straightforward affair. If your vehicle was a four-wheel drive, you drove up to the entrance Read more...
  8. Image for the Asking: A Reflection on the Nature of Things

    Image for the Asking: A Reflection on the Nature of Things Story and image by Don McGowan It is so tempting, given the amazing literal beauty of the geography of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, to become a photographic documentarian of these wonderful mountains and valleys, complete with their complex, diverse array of life forms and habitats. To do this, however, would be, in my humble opinion, Read more...
  9. Image for the Asking: Seeing the Forest Within the Trees

    Image for the Asking: Seeing the Forest Within the Trees Story and image by Don McGowan There are many folks I know who readily assert that their favorite season in the Smokies is winter. They claim this not because there are relatively fewer tourists streaming into Sevier and Blount counties, or back and forth over Newfound Gap from Cherokee and Bryson City. They make this assertion for the very Read more...
  10. Echoes in the Mountains: On Bulls and Close Encounters

    Echoes in the Mountains: On Bulls and Close Encounters Images by Phoebe Carnes When I first started studying the bull elk of Oconaluftee last fall, I quickly learned that each male is an individual. They each have their own quirks that make them easily recognizable. One of the first males I began to study was a bull who goes by the name of “B” within the park service. At nearly 14 Read more...

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