Tag: Photography

  1. Image for the Asking: Waking Up the Cove

    Image for the Asking: Waking Up the Cove Story and image by Don McGowan The great open valleys of the Smokies—Cataloochee in North Carolina; Big Cove in Qualla Boundary; and Cosby, Tuckaleechee, and Cades Cove in Tennessee—are self-contained microcosms of the diverse human history of this wonderful land. Ongoing research and discovery is continuously adding to our Read more...
  2. Image for the Asking: Hark, What Light

    Image for the Asking: Hark, What Light Story and image by Don McGowan  According to most recent accounts there are 848 miles of maintained trails in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, including 71 miles on the Appalachian Trail. These miles are scattered wonderfully across GSMNP from edge to edge and from high to low. In the extreme northeastern corner of the park, just Read more...
  3. Image for the Asking: A River

    Image for the Asking: A River Story and image by Don McGowan  There are nearly 2,900 miles of streams in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. That’s roughly the distance between Asheville, North Carolina, and the Colorado National Monument, just south of Fruita, Colorado, and back again; and nearly 600 miles of that number are suitable for fishing. The watersheds Read more...
  4. Image for the Asking: Snail Eating Up the Forest

    Image for the Asking: Snail Eating Up the Forest Story and image by Don McGowan They are easily overlooked and often quite readily ignored. They often leave a slimy trail wherever they go, which doesn’t necessarily endear them to a lot of people. Yet they are an important part of the web of life in these old mountains, and if you are willing to be completely honest with yourself, they Read more...
  5. Image for the Asking: Why Come It’s Not a Holler Hardwood Forest?

    Image for the Asking: Why Come It’s Not a Holler Hardwood Forest? Story and image by Don McGowan The dictionary of Appalachian English, courtesy of Wikipedia, assures us that a “cove” is a “valley between two ridges.” It goes on to explain that a “holler” is a “valley between two hills.” Now since ridges and hills can be, and on occasion have been, mistaken for Read more...
  6. Image for the Asking: Standing Still behind a Cloud

    Image for the Asking: Standing Still behind a Cloud Story and Image by Don McGowan Benjamin Morton was a Knoxville businessman, and from 1924 to 1927, he was also the mayor of the city. Such an ardent conservationist and a great supporter of the creation of Great Smoky Mountains National Park was he that an overlook of considerable magnitude on the Tennessee side of the mountains was named in his Read more...
  7. Image for the Asking: Now You See Me; Now You Don’t

    Image for the Asking: Now You See Me; Now You Don’t Story and Image by Don McGowan  I will always consider one of the singular highlights of my career to have been the opportunity to be a very small part of the elk reintroduction to Great Smoky Mountains National Park. I took pictures. The great bulk of the credit for the work to reintroduce these magnificent creatures lies in the dream and Read more...
  8. Image for the Asking: The Place of the Balsams

    Image for the Asking: The Place of the Balsams Story and Image by Don McGowan With all of the diverse vegetation that covers Great Smoky Mountains National Park, it is sometimes easy to overlook what is underneath. The under layers of all of that biota are rock strata from the basement of time. Well, let me be completely honest here: the basement of time that I am referencing has a date on Read more...
  9. Image for the Asking: The Last Log Train from Tremont

    Image for the Asking: The Last Log Train from Tremont Story and image by Don McGowan It was in December 1938 that the last logging train pulled out of Tremont bearing to the mill at Townsend trees cut by the Little River Lumber Company along Thunderhead Prong of Middle Prong of Little River. Tremont had been established in 1925 at the confluence of Thunderhead Prong and Lynn Camp Prong, where Read more...
  10. Image for the Asking: One Highway Over the “Too Many Line”

    Image for the Asking: One Highway Over the “Too Many Line” Story and image by Don McGowan In the late summer of 1934, the National Park Service was actively involved in plans to construct a “ridgeline highway” that would bisect the newly minted Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Already at that time the section of the road from Newfound Gap to Clingmans Dome was under construction; and it Read more...

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