Tag: Science

  1. A Day in the Life of Forestry Technician Kate Beckner

    A Day in the Life of Forestry Technician Kate Beckner Karetza (Kate) Beckner is a forestry technician at Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Her job is largely focused on removing invasive or nonnative species so the park’s natural plant inhabitants can thrive. Karetza (Kate) Beckner is a forestry technician at Great Smoky Mountains National Park whose job is to remove invasive Read more...
  2. A Brief History of Air Quality Monitoring

    A Brief History of Air Quality Monitoring By David Brill Unlike most professionals, Jim Renfro knows he’s doing his job well when he can’t see the products of his labors. In fact, when Renfro takes in the view from high atop Clingmans Dome in Great Smoky Mountains National Park and sees nothing but the distant tree-fringed ridges—instead of a veil of unhealthy haze& Read more...
  3. Science and Education Center Conceived 40 Years Ago

    Science and Education Center Conceived 40 Years Ago When Great Smoky Mountains National Park put together a general management plan 40 years ago in 1982, included was the skeleton concept of a new laboratory. This lab would meet the needs of a relatively small group of scientists and researchers who were then working out of historic buildings of the Voorheis Estate, located on Cherokee Orchard Read more...
  4. Community scientists discover a treasure trove of new Smokies species

    Community scientists discover a treasure trove of new Smokies species Over the past few years, national park visitors helped document a slew of new species records in the Smokies using a community science app called iNaturalist. Thanks to the app and a community science project called Smokies Most Wanted, more than 70 species were recently added to the list of over 21,000 species known to Great Smoky Mountains Read more...
  5. Volunteer Preserves Smokies’ Plant Diversity

    Volunteer Preserves Smokies’ Plant Diversity by Aaron Searcy, Publications Associate With the eye of an artist and the steady hand of a lab technician, Janie Bitner carefully preserves some of the rarest and most delicate plants found in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Taken together, the many species she helps enter into the park’s collections build a convincing case Read more...
  6. Park scientists and nature writers reflect on the meaning of ‘habitat’

    Park scientists and nature writers reflect on the meaning of ‘habitat’ George Ellison, whose “Nature Journal” has long been a fixture of the Asheville Citizen-Times, was named one of the 100 most influential people in the history of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. He is shown here with columnist Frances Figart. When the United Nations designated the first Monday of October of Read more...
  7. Wildlife Biologist Helps Elk Return to Appalachia

    Wildlife Biologist Helps Elk Return to Appalachia By Aaron Searcy, Publications Associate In the not-so-distant past, red wolves and bison roamed the Great Smoky Mountains, passenger pigeons flew en masse overhead, and Carolina parakeets chattered in the welcoming branches of American chestnut trees. Today, every one of those species has disappeared from the Southern Appalachian landscape & Read more...
  8. A Chance Encounter with Russula Mushrooms

    A Chance Encounter with Russula Mushrooms Please remember that picking plants is prohibited in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, but some fruits, berries, nuts, and certain mushrooms may be gathered for personal use within limits. No wild mushroom should be eaten unless its identification is certain, which usually requires an expert to determine. Many mushrooms are poisonous, some Read more...
  9. Discover Life in America Keeps on Discovering

    Discover Life in America Keeps on Discovering By Frances Figart, Creative Services Director Did you know that there are now 21,183 total known species in Great Smoky Mountains National Park? That’s a lot of species, and new ones are always likely to be discovered during bioblitz events hosted by nonprofit park partner Discover Life in America (DLiA). DLiA manages the All Taxa Read more...
  10. Park Leads the World in Science of ‘Water Bears’

    Park Leads the World in Science of ‘Water Bears’ By Aaron Searcy When Dr. Paul Bartels takes a walk in the woods, he sees a landscape absolutely teeming with bears. You’ll just need a microscope to see the ‘bears’ he has in mind. “They occur in moss and lichen on trees and rocks,” said Bartels. “They’re also in soil, in leaf litter, and stream Read more...

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