Tag: Wildflowers 101

  1. Wildflowers 101: White Snakeroot and Mountain Gentian

    Wildflowers 101: White Snakeroot and Mountain Gentian Images by Tom Harrington Have you ever heard of “milk sickness”?  What could something like that possibly have to do with wildflowers found in Great Smoky Mountains National Park? Read on to find out.  The first wildflower we shall examine is white snakeroot. White snakeroot generally grows from one to four Read more...
  2. Wildflowers 101: Black-Eyed Susan and Rose Pink

    Wildflowers 101: Black-Eyed Susan and Rose Pink Please remember that picking plants is prohibited in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, but some fruits, berries, nuts, and certain mushrooms may be gathered for personal use within limits. Even some plants with traditional folk uses can have toxic properties if improperly prepared or used. Additionally, no wild mushroom should be eaten unless Read more...
  3. Wildflowers 101: Ironweed and Pale Jewelweed

    Wildflowers 101: Ironweed and Pale Jewelweed Please remember that picking plants is prohibited in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, but some fruits, berries, nuts, and certain mushrooms may be gathered for personal use within limits. Even some plants with traditional folk uses can have toxic properties if improperly prepared or used. Additionally, no wild mushroom should be eaten unless Read more...
  4. Wildflowers 101: More Summer Treats

    Wildflowers 101: More Summer Treats Many of us look forward to summer when we can enjoy yummy homemade ice cream and other fantastic goodies. For me, seeking, finding, identifying, and enjoying wildflowers in the Smokies is almost as enjoyable as eating summer treats. Let’s examine some more beautiful wildflowers that you can discover this season. Yellow- Read more...
  5. Wildflowers 101: Late Summer Wonders

    Wildflowers 101: Late Summer Wonders Story and images by Tom Harrington In this edition of Wildflowers 101, let us look at three more mid to late summer wildflowers: wild golden glow, monkshood, and grass of Parnassus. These three wildflowers have several common characteristics. First, they all grow on Mount Le Conte, which is the third highest mountain in our beautiful Read more...

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