Tag: Wildflowers

  1. Wildflowers 101: Milkweed

    Wildflowers 101: Milkweed Story and images by Tom Harrington  Four-leaf milkweed Who does not enjoy seeing butterflies? Some visitors from Europe who are visiting the national park have told me that they no longer see butterflies in their countries. About this time each year, several people come to Cades Cove to take part in monarch Read more...
  2. Serendipity Leads to Learning about iNaturalist and the Smokies Most Wanted

    Serendipity Leads to Learning about iNaturalist and the Smokies Most Wanted Story and photos by Sue Wasserman Close friends tell me my middle name should be “Serendipity” given my often-impeccable timing for wondrous happenstance. While I tend to chuckle when they say it, I can’t disagree. Middle Prong Trail As if on cue, of course, such happenstance struck yet again just before a Read more...
  3. Plan Ahead for the Spring Wildflower Pilgrimage

    Plan Ahead for the Spring Wildflower Pilgrimage Soon the long, sultry days of summer will be behind us, and autumn will be on the horizon. But some nature lovers in the Smokies may already be enthusiastically awaiting spring and a decades-old event that celebrates the remarkable diversity of wildflowers found in our region. For more than seven decades, the Spring Wildflower Read more...
  4. Camera in the Park: Goldenrod Season in Cades Cove

    Camera in the Park: Goldenrod Season in Cades Cove From about mid-August to the first Smokies frost, bright yellow clusters of goldenrods add intense patches of color to a mostly green landscape.  A quick Wikipedia search turns up interesting facts about the flower, including that it is the state flower of Kentucky, Nebraska, and South Carolina—and previously Alabama before being Read more...
  5. Camera in the Park: Summer Flowers in Cades Cove

    Camera in the Park: Summer Flowers in Cades Cove By Nye Simmons Photography is quite simple, and yet at times it can seem hopelessly complex. Some people go to university to study photography and get advanced degrees, but others manage to do it without any special training at all.  Not a photographer, you say? Chances are you already have a camera app on your phone that has amazing Read more...
  6. Wildflowers 101: Woodland Pinkroot and Mountain Camelia

    Wildflowers 101: Woodland Pinkroot and Mountain Camelia Please remember that picking plants is prohibited in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Additionally, even some plants with traditional folk uses can have toxic properties if improperly prepared or used. Story and images by Tom Harrington In this edition of Wildflowers 101, let’s look at two beautiful wildflowers that are not Read more...
  7. Wildflowers 101: Three Blue Flowers

    Wildflowers 101: Three Blue Flowers Story and images by Tom Harrington If you have an interest in wildflowers, perhaps you have noticed how many flowers are blue in color. The flowers we’ll examine today have small blue blooms. Blue-eyed grass To start, did you know that blue-eyed grass is not a grass? It is related to the iris species. The plant is Read more...
  8. Wildflowers 101: Creeping Phlox and Wild Geranium

    Wildflowers 101: Creeping Phlox and Wild Geranium Please remember that picking plants is prohibited in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Additionally, even some plants with traditional folk uses can have toxic properties if improperly prepared or used. Story and images by Tom Harrington Creeping phlox Today I’ll discuss things “creeping” and “ Read more...
  9. Wildflowers 101: Vasey’s Trillium and Purple Wake Robin

    Wildflowers 101: Vasey’s Trillium and Purple Wake Robin Story and images by Tom Harrington Vasey's trillium Some of the favorite wildflowers found in Great Smoky Mountains National Park are the trilliums, of which there are nine species that grow in the park. In this issue, let’s examine two trilliums whose blooms are often described as being maroon, red, or purple in Read more...
  10. Green With Envy

    Green With Envy Story and photos by Sue Wasserman Jack in the pulpit I don’t remember how old I was when I became enamored of the word “hue.” Thanks to a mom who took my sister and me to the library every week, whether we’d finished our books or not, it’s hard to remember a time when words didn’t hold a Read more...

Items 1-10 of 56

Page
Show per page