Tag: Wildflowers

  1. Wildflowers 101: Black-Eyed Susan and Rose Pink

    Wildflowers 101: Black-Eyed Susan and Rose Pink Please remember that picking plants is prohibited in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, but some fruits, berries, nuts, and certain mushrooms may be gathered for personal use within limits. Even some plants with traditional folk uses can have toxic properties if improperly prepared or used. Additionally, no wild mushroom should be eaten unless Read more...
  2. Wildflowers 101: Ironweed and Pale Jewelweed

    Wildflowers 101: Ironweed and Pale Jewelweed Please remember that picking plants is prohibited in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, but some fruits, berries, nuts, and certain mushrooms may be gathered for personal use within limits. Even some plants with traditional folk uses can have toxic properties if improperly prepared or used. Additionally, no wild mushroom should be eaten unless Read more...
  3. Wildflowers 101: More Summer Treats

    Wildflowers 101: More Summer Treats Many of us look forward to summer when we can enjoy yummy homemade ice cream and other fantastic goodies. For me, seeking, finding, identifying, and enjoying wildflowers in the Smokies is almost as enjoyable as eating summer treats. Let’s examine some more beautiful wildflowers that you can discover this season. Yellow- Read more...
  4. Wildflowers 101: Late Summer Wonders

    Wildflowers 101: Late Summer Wonders Story and images by Tom Harrington In this edition of Wildflowers 101, let us look at three more mid to late summer wildflowers: wild golden glow, monkshood, and grass of Parnassus. These three wildflowers have several common characteristics. First, they all grow on Mount Le Conte, which is the third highest mountain in our beautiful Read more...
  5. Wildflowers 101: Summer Finds

    Wildflowers 101: Summer Finds Crimson Bee Balm Story and images by Tom Harrington As we advance in the summer season, it is only fitting that we examine some summer wildflowers. In this report we will check out crimson beebalm, Turk’s cap lily, and filmy angelica. Crimson beebalm is recognized as having one of the most brilliant scarlet red Read more...
  6. Wildflowers 101: Flame Azalea

    Wildflowers 101: Flame Azalea Story and images by Tom Harrington If we were to take a vote on which wildflower is the most popular in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, my guess is that the flame azalea would certainly be in the top three. The flame azaleas start to bloom in the lower elevations in late April. Higher elevations, including Andrews Bald and Gregory Bald Read more...
  7. Wildflowers 101: Non-traditional Blooms

    Wildflowers 101: Non-traditional Blooms Story and images by Tom Harrington When one gets into wildflowering, often they will find that it involves continuously learning new facts. In doing research for this article, I learned new things about hearts-a-bustin’ and Jack-in-the-pulpit. Today we will examine these flowers as well as leather vase vine. I thought it would be Read more...
  8. Wildflowers 101: Mountain Laurel and Rhododendron

    Wildflowers 101: Mountain Laurel and Rhododendron Story and images by Tom Harrington How many of you enjoy seeing mountain laurel and rhododendron in bloom? In this issue we will examine mountain laurel and Catawba rhododendron since they bloom in May and June. As of the second week of May, mountain laurel was blooming on Ace Gap Trail in large numbers. Many were at peak bloom Read more...
  9. Wildflowers 101: Trillium

    Wildflowers 101: Trillium Top: Painted trillium, Bottom: Nodding trillium Story and images by Tom Harrington As one gets into “wildflowering” in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, they will most likely develop some favorite wildflowers or become fascinated with certain species. One of my favorite wildflowers is trillium, of Read more...
  10. Wildflowers 101: Berry Blooms

    Wildflowers 101: Berry Blooms Please remember that picking plants is prohibited in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, but some fruits, berries, nuts, and certain mushrooms may be gathered for personal use within limits. Take care not to disturb the rest of the plant, and only eat what you can identify as safe. Story by Tom Harrington What is your favorite jam or jelly Read more...

Items 1-10 of 33

Page
Show per page